Women’s Top 5 Health Concerns

0
99

From heart disease to Heart disease is the leading killer of both men and women. In women, the condition is responsible for about 29% of deaths, reports the CDC.

Yet death in itself isn’t the biggest problem for women with chest pain. Some people may have that, but others may just have a little bit of blood cholesterol

  • High blood pressure
  • Physical inactivity
  • Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. It is second to lung cancer as the leading cause of death for women.

    Experts say the fear of breast cancer can sometimes be exaggerated, stopping women from going to their doctors for screening, or pushing women to make smoking, and talking to your doctor about your risk and appropriate screening for breast cancer. He also says to keep risk factors in perspective.

    “Just because your mother didn’t have breast cancer, it does not mean you are immune to this problem,” says Sener. At the same time, it’s also important to note that some women who have one or more risk factors never get breast cancer.

  • Osteoporosis

    Hunched backs, back pain, and frailty used to be things older women had to accept before doctors knew anything more about depression include:

    To help reduce risk of depression, Lynn recommends finding a reason to get up in the morning. She says things such as work, community, love, pets, and volunteering can be good reasons.

    “Statistically, the healthiest adults, both in women and men, are people in significant caring relationships,” says Lynn. She says adults not in nurturing relationships can reduce their risk of depression by making efforts to reach out into the community.

    Autoimmune Diseases

    Autoimmune diseases are a group of disorders in which the immune system attacks the body and destroys or alters tissues. There are more than 80 serious chronic illnesses in this category, including lupus, multiple sclerosis, and diabetes, thyroid disease, and lupus — but as a group, the disorders make up the fourth-largest cause of disability among American women.

    It is not known what causes the body to turn on itself, but genetic, hormonal, and environmental factors are suspects.

    “That’s such a major area of needed research,” says Helentjaris.

    Since autoimmune diseases are not very well understood, pinpointing specific risk factors is difficult. Symptoms can also be nonspecific, hampering proper diagnosis. However, if you know something is wrong with you or a loved one, it’s important to become an active health advocate.

    “It’s very common for women to make multiple visits to multiple doctors to finally get a diagnosis,” she says. “Insist that someone take your symptoms seriously.”

    If you don’t feel like your doctor is taking your complaints seriously, Pearson advises finding another doctor that will take the time to investigate your symptoms.