Energy Shots Review: Do They Work? Are They Safe?

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Tired, stressed-out college students and workers have embraced energy shots, which promise a quick, convenient boost with fewer calories and less sugar than full-size energy drinks.

Sales of the 2- to 3-ounce shots soared to $544 million in 2008, double those of the previous year, according to Information Resources, a Chicago-based market research firm. In fact, energy shots are the fastest-growing segment of the $4.6 billion energy drink market.

Living Essentials pioneered energy shots in 2004 with 5-Hour Energy, which still holds more than 75% of the market. Industry heavyweights such as Red Bull, Monster Energy, and Coca-Cola have since introduced their own energy shots. Their ingredients vary, but most contain exercise is to get your heart rate up and sustain your Integrative Medicine Program at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., says, “Being a more alert drunk isn’t any safer than being a drunk. But that seems to be a growing use among some of my younger patients.”

Who Drinks Energy Shots?

Young men are the most likely to consume energy drinks and shots, although the market among all adults ages 25 to 45 is growing. Young people ages 12 to 17 who consume energy drinks down an average of 5.2 cans a month. Adults drink an average of 4.6 cans.

“Our target market is working adults who experience dietary supplements, energy shots do not require FDA approval before hitting the market.

“A lot of these products contain multiple amounts of ingredients such as taurine and tyrosine and blood cells, and 2,000% of the recommended intake of B6. vitamin B3 (breakfast.

  • Take a quick exercise break, such as a short walk.
  • Exercise regularly.
  • Consider paced breathing, which can improve your heart rate and boost relaxation, or meditating for a short time.
  • enough sleep.