How to Deal With Anxiety: Learning How to Cope

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Divorce, layoffs, threat of terrorism — there’s plenty of anxiety around for everyone these days. And very often, the source is something we can’t change. How do you know when it’s time to get help dealing with your anxieties?

To better understand the underpinnings of stomach is upset. You might even have a Generalized anxiety disorder is a bigger syndrome — “like a worry machine in your head,” Ross says. “If it’s not one thing, it’s another. You’re procrastinating to the point that you’re almost afraid to take a step. You’re so nervous about going to your child’s school to talk to the teacher, you just don’t go — you miss the appointment.”

In the case of such overwhelming anxiety, “people are not making good decisions,” says Ross. “They’re avoiding things, or they’re unable to rise to the occasion because the anxiety is too much. They’re procrastinating because they can’t concentrate, can’t stay focused. It’s really interfering with their day-to-day life. At that point, they may have a more serious anxiety problem and need professional help.”

How Do You Cope?

To cope with plain-vanilla anxiety, “get real,” as they say. “Separate out the real risks and dangers that a situation presents and those your imagination is making worse,” advises Ross. It’s a twist on the old adage: “Take control of the things you can, and accept those you can’t change.”

“Ask yourself: Where can you take control of a situation? Where can you make changes? Then do what needs to be done,” she says. “What things do you simply have to accept? That’s very important.”

Very often, it’s possible to get past an anxiety cycle with the help of friends or family — someone who can help you sort out your problems. But when anxiety becomes overwhelming, it’s time for a therapist, or perhaps yoga, meditation, or get some exercise. Antidepressants, particularly the SSRIs, may be effective in treating many types of anxiety disorders.

Other treatment includes benzodiazepines, such as Valium, Ativan, and Xanax alone or in combination with SSRI medication. These drugs do carry a risk of addiction so they are not as desirable for long-term use. Other possible side effects include drowsiness, poor concentration, and irritability.

Beta-blockers can prevent the physical symptoms that accompany certain anxiety disorders, particularly social phobia.